BananaPro/Pi:SD card installation

From BananaPro/Pi
Jump to: navigation, search

How to Install most OS images (except Android)

This method will install most of the OS images available from our website (but not the Android ones – see further below).


Windows

  1. Insert the SD card into your computer. The size of the SD should be larger than the OS image size, generally 4GB or greater. Class 4 or higher is good. (The class is a measure of data transfer speed.)
  2. Format the SD card.
    1. Download an SD card format tool such as SD Formatter from https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/eula_windows/
    2. Unzip the download file and run (as Administrator) the setup.exe to install the software on your machine. Run the tool (again with Run as Administrator) from the icon it makes on your desktop.
    3. In the "Options" menu, set "FORMAT TYPE" option to QUICK, "FORMAT SIZE ADJUSTMENT" option to "ON".
    SDFORmatter V3.0.0.0.png Option Setting.png
    Check that the drive letter of the SD card you have inserted matches EXACTLY the one selected by the software.
    Warning: if you don't check this carefully, there is a danger of formatting one of your other drives accidentally. See this forum link for help if you do this. We are not responsible for any loss of data. To be safe, only have your main Windows hard drive running and with only one SD card inserted. Disconnect all other USB devices and drives.
    Click the "Format" button.
  3. Then download the OS image from the Downloads web page:
    http://www.lemaker.org/resources/9-38/image_files.html
  4. Unzip the download file to get the OS image.
    To do this, right click on the file and choose “Extract all”. It should give you a file with the extension .img
    Ensure that neither the file name of the image you're using nor the path contain any spaces (or other odd characters for that matter).
  5. Write the image file to the SD card.
    To do this, download a tool that can write images to an SD card, such as Win32 Diskimager from:
    http://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/files/Archive/
    Open the unzipped image file.
    Win32 Disk Imager.png
    Again, check and DOUBLE CHECK the drive letter is correct. See this forum link for help if you do this. Click the Write button. Wait patiently to successfully complete the writing process. Do not disturb the SD card or remove it or turn off the computer during this process. Serious damage to the card and also possibly to your computer hardware can happen if you do so.


Ubuntu (Linux)

  1. Insert your SD card into your computer. The size of the SD should be larger than the OS image size, generally 4GB or greater.
  2. Format the SD card.
    1. Check the SD card node.
      sudo fdisk -l
    2. Delete all existing partitions on the SD card.
      Use the o command to delete all partitions on the SD card and then use the n command to add one new partition and use the w command to save the changes.
      sudo fdisk /dev/sdx
    3. Format all the partitions of SD card as FAT32.
      sudo mkfs.vfat /dev/sdxx
      (x should be replaced according to your SD card node as determined in the first step above)
      You can also skip this step because the write image command dd in Linux will format the SD card automatically.
  3. Download the OS image from the Downloads webpage:
    http://www.lemaker.org/index.php?m=content&c=index&a=show&catid=9&id=38
  4. Unzip the download file to get the OS image (.img)
    unzip [path]/[downloaded filename]
    If the filename extension is .tgz, run the following command.
    tar -zxvf [path]/[downloaded filename]
    Ensure that neither the file name of the image you're using nor the path contain any spaces (or other odd characters for that matter).
  5. Write the image file to the SD card.
    1. Check the SD card node.
      sudo fdisk -l
    2. (Optional step) Verify if the hash key of the zip file is the same as shown on the downloads page.
      sha1sum [path]/[imagename]
      This will print out a long hex number which should match the "SHA-1" line for the SD image you have downloaded.
    3. Unmount all the partitions of the the SD card
      umount /dev/sdxx
    4. Write the image file to SD card.
      sudo dd bs=4M if=[path]/[imagename] of=/dev/sdx
      Wait patiently to successfully complete the writing process. Please note that the block size set to 4M will work most of the time - if not, please try 1M, although 1M will take considerably longer. You can use the command below to check progress..
      sudo pkill -USR1 -n -x dd



Installing the Android OS image

The Android images (4.2 v2.0 & 4.4 beta 1) cannot unfortunately use the dd command in Linux or the Win32Diskimager in Windows, so you need to use the PhoenixCard tool to write the image the SD card.
(Note : If your laptop's card slot cannot burn the SD card, you should use an external USB SD card reader instead. )

  1. Download the Android image and PhoenixCard.
    The Android 4.2 image (a LeMaker product) from our Downloads page:
    http://www.lemaker.org/resources/9-38/image_files.html
    The Android 4.4 image (not a LeMaker product) from the external website.
    PhoenixCard:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_VynIqhAcB7NTg2UkRDdHRWX2s/edit?usp=sharing
    Install the Phoenixcard software (Run as Administrator), then start the program from its icon (also using Run as Administrator).
  2. First, check the disk letter is EXACTLY the same as your SD card with the button 'Disk Check'. (Better safe than sorry – disconnect all other USB devices and secondary hard drives before continuing. See this forum link for help if you do this.) Then load the disk file by clicking on the button 'Img File'. Next step – click the radio button 'Startup' in the Write Mode box, then press the 'Format to Normal' button.


Phoenixcard1.jpg


Please note: although the text in the window of the above screenshot says "Device OK, the size of the device is XXXXX M", depending on your system and if it is an internal/external or single/multi-card reader, you may instead get only a message such as "Find 4 device, Please select correct the one" [sic].


Phoenixcard2.jpg


Burn the Android image to the SD card (by pressing 'Burn' of course).


Phoenixcard3.jpg


This can take quite a while so be patient. As mentioned previously, do not disturb the SD card or remove it or turn off the computer during this process. Serious damage to the card and/or computer hardware can occur.


Phoenixcard4.jpg


When the final 'Success' message appears, soft-eject the card using the 'Safely Remove Hardware' function in the Notification Area/System Tray (bottom right hand corner of the Windows screen). Now you can physically remove it and then insert it into the Banana Pi, plug in the mouse (a physical keyboard is optional as you can use Android's in-built on-screen version instead), the display and finally the power supply to experience the Android system on your Banana Pi.


The Android system start-up GUI

(GUI = Graphical User Interface)


NB. The first time the system starts will take a long time, so please be patient - subsequent boots will be quicker.


The picture below shows the start screen of the 'Android 4.2 for the Banana Pi v2.0' image.


Android v2.jpg


(With thanks to native speaker “roses” for checking and upgrading this document)